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Gil Eyal Precision Medicine

Talk by Gil Eyal

Datum/Tijd
Date(s) - 15/11/2018
12:30 - 14:00

Locatie
Stadscampus Universiteit van Antwerpen

Categorieën


The doctor-patient relationship in the age of precision medicine

Cynics may object that precision medicine (PM) is mostly hype and exists primarily in documents whose very titles – e.g., “Toward Precision Medicine”– indicate their promissory nature. In this talk, I argue that this is not so.

Abstract

The completion of the Human Genome Project was heralded as a step towards “personalized medicine,” offering patients individualized treatments based on genomic profiling. More recently, this vision has been eclipsed by the promise of “precision medicine” (PM), emphasizing benefits to patients from more precise diagnosis and treatment based on a range of biomarkers, along with data about patients’ environment, life-style and behaviors. Cynics may object that PM is mostly hype and exists primarily in documents whose very titles – e.g., “Toward Precision Medicine”– indicate their promissory nature.

In this talk, I argue that this is not so. PM is part of a longstanding attempt to reorient medical diagnosis and treatment to take advantage of genomics research and other approaches leveraging big data, such as electronic medical record research and crowd-sourced health tracking. These efforts are progressively elaborating an increasingly coherent vision of a different kind of medicine.

Bio Gil Eyal

Gil Eyal is Professor of Sociology at Columbia University in New York. He is also co-leading a recent initiative on “Precision Medicine & Society” at Columbia, meant to bring together social scientists who are doing cutting-edge work on recent development in medicine, and put them in conversation with medical researchers and leaders of medical education involved in Precision Medicine projects.

Among his recent books and articles are: (with Brendan Hart, Emine Onculer, Neta Oren and Natahsa Rossi), The Autism Matrix: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic. (Polity 2010); “For A Sociology of Expertise” (American Journal of Sociology 2013); (with Dan Navon) “Looping Genomes: Diagnostic Change and the Genetic Makeup of the Autism Population.” (American Journal of Sociology 2016); and “The Physician-Patient Relationship in the Age of Precision Medicine.” (forthcoming in Genetics in Medicine). He is currently preparing a book, tentatively titled “The Crisis of Expertise.”

Researchgate

Information

  • Location: University of Antwerp, Stadscampus, room D424
  • Date: 15th of November
  • Time: 12:30-14:00
  • Attendance is free
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